Posts Tagged ‘Wessyngton Plantation’

Television Interview with John Seigenthaler Sr.

Monday, May 18th, 2009

My half-hour television interview with John Seigenthaler Sr, A Word on Words, is available as a free downloadable Podcast.

http://www.wnpt.org/productions/wow/

 

Mr. Seigenthaler asked me many in-depth thought-provoking questions.  At the end, he said, “I learned more from your book than I learned from reading my friend Alex Haley’s book called  Roots.” I hope you enjoy the interview. Leave a comment with your reaction.

The Founding of Wessyngton Plantation

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009
1785 Land Grant to Moses Winters

1785 Land Grant to Moses Winters

{Deed}

Stories of the founding of Wessyngton Plantation have been passed down through generations of the Washington family.  These stories were corroborated by deeds and other documents I found in the Washington Family Papers in the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville.  In this deed, we learn that Moses Winters was granted 640 acres of land for military service in the Revolutionary War. Joseph Washington later bought this land which became part of the Wessyngton estate.

John Baker Presents Mrs. Ann Nixon Cooper with The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation-Video

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

Baker-Presents-His-Book-to-Mrs-Cooper

While in Atlanta for a presentation and book signing at Auburn Research Library for the National Black Arts Festival in February I had the honor of presenting Mrs. Ann Nixon Cooper a copy of my book; The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation: Stories of My Family’s Journey to Freedom.  I also had Mrs. Cooper to sign a copy of the book for me on the page she was pictured on.  Mrs. Cooper is now 107 years old.

Native Americans on Wessyngton Plantation

Friday, May 1st, 2009
Native American Arrowheads found at Wessyngton

Native American Arrowheads found at Wessyngton

Based on arrowheads found on Wessyngton Plantation, Native Americans lived in the area thousands of years ago.  Arrowheads and other Native American artifacts have been found at Wessyngton by farmers plowing the fields for many years.

During the Cherokee removal known as the Trail of Tears during the 1830s, hundreds of Native Americans passed through Robertson County, Tennessee.   Descendants of the Washington family and African Americans who lived at Wessyngton told their descendants that Native Americans came to the Wessyngton mansion to get food and water enroute to Port Royal.  They were marched from Port Royal  to Hopkinsville, Kentucky where they spent the winter of 1838-39.  From Hopkinsville they were forced on to the reservations in Oklahoma.

Baker Interview on the Plus Side of Nashville

Friday, May 1st, 2009

http://www.newschannel5.com/Global/story.asp?S=5373517&nav=menu374_9

On March 31st I was honored to have Tuwanda Coleman interview me for the Plus Side of Nashville about the release of my book The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation: Stories of My Family’s Journey to Freedom.  I really enjoyed being on the show.  Mrs. Coleman asked how my research started more than thirty years ago, how I got a book deal with Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster and my future plans.

Book Tour- First Stop

Thursday, February 5th, 2009

I’m starting on my Book Tour. I’ll be going to Evansville, IN to speak at a museum, to school, and other venues. I will also be on television and radio. My dates there will be Friday Feb. 6 to Saturday. These events were set up by my Washington cousins. For years at every program some would ask “When is your book coming out?” Now I can answer, “Here it is!” You can see all the events: http://wessyngton.com/Index/Appearances